And so it begins…

Let me introduce myself a bit, and share my film style preferences, so you can see if our tones align and if you want to continue reading because, hey, we might not like the same things and that’s okay!

I love a good fight scene. The more creative the better. I’m talking John Wick using a horse as a weapon (in a way that does NOT hurt the horse), The Bride tackling the Crazy 88’s by herself in Kill Bill, and for a bit of nostalgia, Kevin McCallister using everyday household items to rain chaos down on those poor burglars in Home Alone. 

I’m the type of person who laughs in the theater at the coolest kill shots when most other people are shielding their faces in disgust. Not because I enjoy people getting hurt, but because these scenes are just so darn creative! Good choreography is hard, now add in realistic fighting, dialogue, acting that doesn’t look fake, and something unique that audiences haven’t seen before and I’m just in awe.

That’s basically me and what I find inspiring. I’m an action film junkie. Hopefully one day I’ll be able to help one of these types of films come to life, but for now I’ll just learn from watching others and share my thoughts here on this blog. 

Talk soon!

Katrina Rotondo

3 comments

  1. Indeed, John Wick saga have a lot of fight scenes! I’m eager for John Wick Chapter 4 in 2022 to watch how the film introduce new fights scenes!
    Did you know that Keanu Reeves did 98% of its fights scenes (meaning stunt scenes)?

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  2. I love your introduction. I’ve never been passionate about fight scenes but it’s definitely inspiring to hear your perspective! I do have a question though, when you laugh during a fight scene are you still able to be “in the movie”, like that’s just how you express yourself, or are you usually analyzing the movie in that moment?

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    1. Hey Emma,

      Thank you! I definitely use the laughter to express the glee I get from the scenes but am always analyzing the movie too, it’s a habit that is hard to turn off. I’m not analyzing it in a negative way, but usually more-so in a way that I just find the particular scene so innventive or creatively stunning that the laughter is a form of appreciation.

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